The Origins of Noir: The Case for the Policier

“Renoir’s second talkie, La Nuit du carrefour (1932)— my all-time favorite French noir, and the sexiest movie he ever made…  his edgy adaptation of Georges Simenon’s Maigret at the Crossroads, filmed in a foggy suburb that vibrates with off-screen sounds and a mysterious Danish heroine (Winna Winifried), cries out for discovery.” – Jonathon Rosenbaum

In 1931 Georges Simenon’s crime novel La Nuit du Carrefour was published by the French pulp magazine Police Magazine:

La Nuit De Carrefour (1932)

In 1932 Jean Renoir in his second film adapted the story for the screen:

La Nuit De Carrefour (1932) La Nuit De Carrefour (1932)

La Nuit De Carrefour (1932) La Nuit De Carrefour (1932)

La Nuit De Carrefour (1932) La Nuit De Carrefour (1932)

The Legion of Decency: Under the Radar?

I have added to yesterday’s post Big Week for Noirs on Oz TV a rather risque poster for The Ghost Ship (1943), and a ‘covered-up’ version, which Dark City Dame (“DCD”) in a comment to the post, suggests, I think rightly, was a censored version of the original.  DCD also tells us of another poster for I Love Trouble (1948), which leaves only a little more to the imagination.  We both wonder if these two posters ever did get released?

The Ghost Ship (1943)I Love Trouble (1948)
Click on each image to zoom…