Cities Have Lost Their Poetry

Thirty years ago in my late 20s on many lonely cold winter nights I walked the desolate streets of the city fringe… down narrow sparsely-lit alleys

Noir City: Sydney Harbour 1950s - Original photo by Max Dupane

Thirty years ago in my late 20s on many lonely cold winter nights I walked the desolate streets of the city fringe. Down narrow sparsely-lit alleys with dark dirty store-fronts, ominous warehouses, and desperate characters.  A salty dampness and the silhouettes of sea-faring hulks on Sydney harbor drawing me into an enveloping angst.  There was mystery, an aching feeling of some unfathomable loss, of poetry.

Today those streets are bright, lined with trendy restaurants, exclusive warehouse conversions, soul-less showrooms for funky furniture, and expensive cars.  No mystery, no angst, and no poetry.

 

3 thoughts on “Cities Have Lost Their Poetry”

  1. So true. Cities have lost any edge. Either the private owned establishments have gone under and left a ghost town or the big name companies mow over any sense of individuality. Orlando, Florida is a good example. We use to have Open Mike nights and dark coffee houses. Now we have a drive-thru Starbucks.

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  2. So much for the idea that the dark, more provocative elements don’t inspire on the level of bland security. The poetry was there back then, and your eloquent descriptive remembrance makes the case a compelling one.

    Lovely.

    Like

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