Winna Winifried in Renoir’s La Nuit du Carrefour (1932): “a bizarre gamin”

For Else

Stoned, immaculate

Siren for a delicious purgatory
a wanton butterfly she flutters wings that beckon
to a bed of lurid bliss

She mopes she languishes she swoons
she formulates a trajectory to the stars
from the milky way of her bosom to the glistening ivory of her ice cold thighs

A gambit for a gentle trap so you can fall into a warm moist grotto
and shut her doe eyes with kisses four

She does not leave you by a cold hill side
but caresses your tongue in her luscious mouth
her lips labia that clasp a deep penetration
and hold you transfixed

She leaves you a broken wreck
panting for more

You beg for
just a glimpse

An insolent glare has you shuddering
you want her to incinerate you with those eyes
incendiary transports to a cosmic nirvana

Her anger and petulant pout
a delirium
a narcotic –
you will expire for a fix

Until she graces her enfolding embrace over you
and sighs deep ecstatic sighs

Agony
Until she turns you to her
and you drown in a dark languid pool

 

5 thoughts on “Winna Winifried in Renoir’s La Nuit du Carrefour (1932): “a bizarre gamin””

  1. I watched Jean Renoir’s LA NUIT DU CARREFORE only weeks ago for the very first time. I’ll admit I will need to sit through it again to absorb it’s dazzling style, even if it’s widely contended that there is a section missing from the film, which adversely affects the seemingly convoluted narrative. Of course, as you so compellingly relate here there is a poetic underpinning to this celebrated noir, which in and of itself is a sturdy argument against dismissal. Your brush strokes have again painted this most fascinating character from all levels of deceit (and therwise). A number of Renoir’s earlier films would be elevated further by your very special interpretations. (UNE PARTIE DE CAMPAGNE, LA CHIENNE foremost).

    Like

  2. Hi! Tony, and Sam Juliano…
    Unfortunately, I have never watched Renoir’s La Nuit de Carrefour.

    Tony, this is a very beautiful poem (poetry)and the poem must (be)describing the femme lead in this film?!? I have to assume…

    Therefore, I must seek it out to watch very…soon!
    Thanks, for sharing!
    DeeDee 😉

    Like

  3. Tony,
    I read that Simenon a long time ago, but I’m struck by how non-Maigret the film must be! It’s one I’m going to look for.
    Your poem and the photos light a fire! The photo of actress Winna Winifried, at the outset of your your exciting tribute, reminds me of another presence who could take your breath away, Catherine Deneuve.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s