Noir Poets: Raymond Chandler

Farewell My Lovely (1975)

It got darker. I thought; and thought in my mind moved with a kind of sluggish stealthiness, as if it was being watched by bitter and sadistic eyes. I thought of dead eyes looking at a moonless sky, with black blood at the corners of the mouths beneath them. I thought of nasty old women beaten to death against the posts of their dirty beds. I thought of a man with bright blond hair who was afraid and didn’t quite know what he was afraid of, who was sensitive enough to know that something was wrong, and too vain or too dull to guess what it was that was wrong. I thought of beautiful rich women who could be had. I thought of nice slim curious girls who lived alone and could be had too, in a different way. I thought of cops, tough cops that could be greased and yet were not by any means all bad, like Hemingway. Fat prosperous cops with Chamber of Commerce voices, like Chief Wax. Slim, smart and deadly cops like Randall, who for all their smartness and deadliness were not free to do a clean job in a clean way. I thought of sour old goats like Nulty who had given up trying. I though of Indians and psychics and dope doctors.

Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely, 1940, ch.34 par.3

2 thoughts on “Noir Poets: Raymond Chandler”

  1. Hi! Tony,
    What a nice screenshot (of actor Robert Mitchum) that compliments the quote by Raymond Chandler, from the book Farewell, My Lovely,perfectly.
    Thanks, for sharing!
    DeeDee 😉

    Like

  2. Well, we have the quintessential ‘noir poet’ on display here – the single most important genius this literary genre has ever produced, and the one writer who has exerted the most lasting influence. The passage here from FAREWELL MY LOVELY is incredibly descriptive and trenchant, and as Dee Dee says it’s ‘perfection.’

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s